Annotation, annotation, annotation…

Getting good art and design sketchbook annotation is no easy feat… It’s either too much or too little. Too wordy it sounds pompous and impersonal, or so basic it just describes an image with no analysis at all. I’ve tried word banks to help students, and analysis guides based on the formal elements, but none of this was quite working. So I bit the bullet and produced a poster/handout that says everything that I find I’m always feeding-back to students verbally about their annotation.

Art and design sketchbook annotation

It may be stating the obvious, but I’ve found it has certainly helped focus the mind for my students. There’s no excuse now for stating the obvious, or overwhelming the practical work with a lengthy essay. It’s a checklist advising them how to get the balance right.

The download is also available direct from the felt-tip-pen resources shop here. You can also download it here in my TpT shop, along with other handouts to help students develop the skills to become awesome artists – and jump through some exam hoops along the way.

There are links to other resources you may find handy here:

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7 Replies to “Annotation, annotation, annotation…”

  1. […] my recent preoccupation with writing about art (see my last two posts on annotation and vocabulary), I have completed the flurry of activity by putting together a literacy mat for my […]

  2. […] annotation advice […]

  3. […] The lesson also asks students to annotate their painting sample sheet. I find it is good practice to get them evaluating their work as they go along. I have a couple of other resources which can help with annotation which you can find here. […]

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